Everyone will tell you different ways to cope with the depression and anxiety caused by PTSD.  Each are valid methods and each will have different effects on different people.  It is worth giving them each a go to see what works for you. 

Some notably effective things you could try to fight anxiety and depression are:

Get as much sleep as you can.

The brain gauges the amount of light you get each day, and it uses that information to reset your body clock. Without light exposure, the body clock eventually gets out of sync, and when that happens, it throws off important circadian rhythms that regulate energy, sleep, appetite, and hormone levels. The disruption of these important biological rhythms can, in turn, trigger clinical depression.

Practice mindfulness and meditation.

Mindfulness meditation is a mental training practice that involves focusing your mind on your experiences (like your own emotions, thoughts, and sensations) in the present moment. Read more... 

Exercise and eat well.

Regular exercise can have a positive impact on your mental health by reducing the anxiety and depression caused by PTSD. Read more...

Be social and have personal contact.

PTSD can make you feel disconnected from others. You may be tempted to withdraw from social activities and your loved ones. But it’s important to stay connected to life and the people who care about you. You don’t have to talk about the trauma if you don’t want to, but the caring support and companionship of others is vital to your recovery. Read more...

Use aromatherapy to help calm and relax.

The positive effect essential oils can have on us is astounding, and people with post traumatic stress disorder often find that aromatherapy can help them to manage their symptoms. Read more...

PTSD can make you feel disconnected from others. You may be tempted to withdraw from social activities and your loved ones. But it’s important to stay connected to life and the people who care about you. You don’t have to talk about the trauma if you don’t want to, but the caring support and companionship of others is vital to your recovery.

Remember that you are never alone! Join Code 9's private group to help you feel less isolated and alone and also provide invaluable information on how to cope with symptoms and work towards recovery.

Code 9 also offers low key catch-up coffee meet-ups where you can organise to get together with other members in your area for a quick coffee or come to our peer to peer support nights to gain further insight and support.

 

Aromatherapy and essential oils are a useful tool to ground yourself in times of distress and to help manage your symptoms.

Some members have noted benefits in using oils around the home in diffusers to help calm them and for sleep and other oils dripped onto a leather or lava-bead wristband to help them ground themselves when out in the world.

Some oils that have been known to achieve results are:

Lavender - to help alleviate fear, anxiety, stress, panic and depression, as well as reduce nightmares and sleep disturbances.
Bergamot - to help relieve anxiety and fear.
Ylang ylang and clary sage - to assist with anger and rage.
Frankincense, chamomile and sandalwood - to assist with general PTSD syptoms.

For best results visit a trained aromatherapist to learn how to use, and get the benefits of, essential oils safely to assist with your PTSD.

 

Mindfulness meditation is a mental training practice that involves focusing your mind on your experiences (like your own emotions, thoughts, and sensations) in the present moment. Mindfulness meditation can involve breathing practice, mental imagery, awareness of body and mind, and muscle and body relaxation.

Mindfulness is a very benficial grounding technique if you are feeling anxious from a triggering event but  can also assist with pain relief, aid your sleep and help manage stress.  It is sometimes difficult to get the hang of but the meditation and mindfulness apps suggested on the 'Help to Cope' page may get you started.

Code 9 also have partners and supporters, see below, that are committed to helping you on your journey through PTSD with yoga, mindfulness, massage and floatation.

 

Regular exercise can have a positive impact on your mental health by reducing the anxiety and depression caused by PTSD.

Exercise is a powerful tool in the fight of anxiety and depression for several reasons. It promotes many changes in the brain, including neural growth, reduced inflammation, and new activity patterns that provide feelings of calm and well-being.  It also boosts physical and mental energy, relieves tension and stress, and enhances well-being through the release of endorphins. Exercise can also serve as a much needed distraction, allowing you to find some time to break out of the cycle of negative thoughts that feed depression.  In addition it also:

  • Helps you sleep better so you rest fully at night and feel more energised during the day.
  • Gives you a sense of accomplishment as your fitness improves and you start achieving your goals.
  • Exercise is usually a shared activity with others so you get the added benefits of social connection.

Before starting any exercise program, you should first consult your doctor to ensure that you do it safely. Your doctor may also be able to help you identify the best exercises given your goals, age, weight, or other possible physical health problems.

Code 9 has many partners and supporters, see below, that are committed to helping you on your journey finding wellness from PTSD through excercise.